Posted On: July 25, 2014 by Patrick A. Malone

Spray-On Sunscreen Is Not for Small Fry

Except for the youngest infants, using sunscreen is a good idea for anyone hoping to avoid the cancer and cosmetic risks of too much sun exposure. But one form of protection is not recommended for children: spray-on sunscreen.

Infants younger than 6 months should not use sunscreen; the best protection for them is to keep them out of the sun. That’s because their skin is immature and they have a higher surface-area-to-body-weight ratio compared with older children and adults. Those two characteristics make an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens much greater, increasing their risk of side effects.

As explained by Consumer Reports, aerosol applications of sunscreen present the risk of inhaling ingredients that irritate the lungs. Earlier this summer, according to the magazine, the FDA said it was investigating these potential risks. Also, spray products are flammable, so don’t use them near a grill or fire, and don’t let even older kids fool around with them near an open flame.

No one of any age should inhale this stuff, but children are at greater risk because they’re more likely to move around while they’re being sprayed and accidentally get a dose where it doesn’t belong.

The safe use of sunscreen, says Consumer Reports, includes these practices:


  • Don’t use sprays on children, unless you have no other product available. In that case, spray the sunscreen onto your hands and rub it on. As with all sunscreens, be especially careful on the face, taking care to avoid the eyes and mouth.

  • Adults can use sprays, but don’t spray your face. Spray your hands and rub it on your face, making sure to avoid your eyes and mouth. Avoid inhaling it.

  • Make sure you apply enough. The magazine’s tests have found that sprays can work well when used properly, but it’s more difficult to gauge if you apply enough, especially when it’s windy. Spray as much as can be evenly applied, and then repeat the application, just to be safe. On windy days, spray the sunscreen on your hands and rub it on, or go with a lotion instead.


To see the FDA’s sunscreen recommendations, link here. For the agency’s sun safety tips for infants, link here. For Consumer Report’s recommendations for sunscreens for kids and babies, link here. To see what Consumer Reports has to say about sunscreens generally, and to review its list of recommended products, link here (some pages are subscription only).

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