Posted On: August 15, 2014 by Patrick A. Malone

All-Terrain Vehicles Are Not Toys

Here’s a “Say what?” statistic that should give parents pause: More than half of all teens who have driven an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) have been involved in an accident.

So says research recently published in the Annals of Family Medicine. The report also shows a propensity for teens to engage in several kinds of risky behavior when they ride on an ATV.

As explained on AboutLawsuits.com, researchers from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine found that 3 in 4 teenagers in the state of Iowa have driven an ATV and that kids 15 and younger represented 1 in 5 ATV-related deaths.

The findings about the number of teens who had been in crashes were similar to previous studies from other states.

The conclusions were based on a survey of 4,684 youngsters between 11 and 16 taken over 2½ years at 30 different schools throughout Iowa. More than 1 in 3 of the kids who said they’d ridden an ATV reported doing so every day or every week. More than half of the ATV riders said they’d been in at least one accident, and nearly all of them acknowledged having engaged in risky behavior, which was defined as:


  • riding with a passenger (9 in 10 reported doing this);

  • riding on public roads (8 in 10);

  • riding without a helmet (more than 6 in 10).


Six in 10 respondents reported having engaged in all three dangerous behaviors at some point. A scant 2 in 100 said they had engaged in none of them.

According to the ATV Safety Information Center, an initiative of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, of about 100,000 ATV injuries in 2012, one-quarter were kids younger than 16, and of the 353 ATV fatalities that year, 54 were from that group.

Even for people who are careful, ATVs are dangerous — they’re powerful and can be unstable, especially if they have more riders than they’re built to accommodate.

The most fearsome accidents, of course, involve brain injuries, which, according to the new study, “are among the leading cause of death and disability from ATV crashes. They are more likely to occur on the roadway than off road, even when controlling for helmet use. Helmets are estimated to reduce the risk of fatal ATV-related head injuries by 40% and of nonfatal head injuries by 60% or more.”

To learn more about brain injuries, see our backgrounder.

If you and your family enjoy riding all-terrain vehicles, make sure you follow the safety guidelines provided by the CPSC:


  • Do not drive ATVs on paved roads.

  • Do not allow a child under 16 to drive or ride an adult ATV.

  • Do not drive ATVs with a passenger or ride as a passenger.

  • Always wear a helmet and other protective gear such as eye protection, boots, gloves, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt.

  • Take a hands-on safety training course.


Families interested in learning more about our firm's legal services, including legal representation for children who have suffered serious injuries in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia due to medical malpractice, defective products, birth-related trauma or other injuries, may ask questions or send us information about a particular case by phone or email. There is no charge for contacting us regarding your inquiry. An attorney will respond within 24 hours.

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